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BUSN11080 Managing Organisational HealthUniversity of the West of Scotland

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University of the West of Scotland

BUSN11080 Managing Organisational HealthUniversity of the West of Scotland

Introduction
……………………………………………………………………………………. 2
1. Definition of Organizational Performance
Management…………………………….. 2
2. Measuring
Performance………………………………………………………………… 2
2.1. Balanced
Scorecard…………………………………………………………………. 2
2.2. Performance
Prism………………………………………………………………….. 3
3. The pervasive characteristics of
OPM…………………………………………………. 4
3.1. Strategic Business
Plan……………………………………………………………… 5
3.2. Targets……………………………………………………………………………….
5
3.3. Implementation……………………………………………………………………
… 6
3.4. Monitoring……………………………………………………………………………
6
3.5. Employee’s
Motivation……………………………………………………………… 6
Conclusions………………………………………………………………………………………
. 6
References……………………………………………………………………………………….
7
Introduction
Lack of strategy, leadership, ineffectively defined plans; poor communication and a dysfunctional
organizational structure are the main reasons for organizational failure. Therefore, stakeholders are
confronting increasingly critical difficulties. Along these lines, there is a need for a widely inclusive
management strategy to guarantee that all the organizations are achieving the top possible level in
courtesy of business objectives and goals by ensuring that all their strategies concentrate around on
one systematic approach, well known as ‘Organizational Performance Management’. This essay will
discuss the critical function of OPM with a specific focus on its role and its pervasive characteristics in
accomplishing organizational success and effectiveness.
1. Definition of Organizational Performance Management
The expression “Performance Management” indicates an integrated systematic approach to
enhance organizational overall performance and promote an organization’s values and mission
(Lawler, 2003). Furthermore, Lockett (1992) states that OPM is a manner for setting up the shared
perception in term of performance and a method to develop and manage people in order to increase
the achieved aims in the short and long term. While Buytendijk (2009) debates that a perfect
performance management system should concentrate on outcomes and not outputs. As easy as it
might sound, Performance management can be interpreted differently through different perspectives
of people. Therefore, we can say that performance management strategy is a necessary tool to ensure
that the human capital maintains the corporate values and tread in the route of accomplishment of
the ultimate company mission and vision.
2. Measuring Performance
Performance Measurement is reflected as a fraction of the overall Performance Management
framework and considered as a matrix to reflect the need for balanced measurement (Keegan, Eiler &
Jones, 1989). As reported by Bates (1999), measuring performance strategy is a system for stabilizing
different indicators (quality, time and cost) towards different standards (processes, people, and
organization). Whereas, Mackie (2008) argues that performance measurement will only be successful
if there is possession at all a level. Many organizations utilize some of the new approaches but the
most popular management frameworks are ‘Balanced Scorecard’ and “Performance Prism’’.
2.1. Balanced Scorecard
However, Hung-Yi Wu (2012) mentions that BSC helps to monitor and measure the key
performance indicators (KPIs) which can track strategic performance, whereas Dumond (1994)
suggests that utilizing balanced scorecard technique enhances the decision-making capabilities. For
example, The British Standard Chartered Bank implemented the BSC to measure both the non-financial
and financial performance indicators (Seshadri & Panicker, 2013). In effect, companies always map out
to construct an efficient tool to aid them well accomplish the target and manage the performance.
Another illustrative example is the Toyota Company when it was facing a challenging situation with its
competitors. Toyota decided to concentrate on the pillars of BSC (figure 1), this decision helped Toyota
to become one of the top world car selling corporations (Iyer, Ananth, Sridhar, and Roy Vasher, 2009).

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BUSN11080 Managing Organisational HealthUniversity of the West of Scotland

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